57.3 Read and Proclaimed

57.3 Read and Proclaimed

The Revised Common Lectionary: Sources and Secrets

The Revised Common Lectionary: Sources and Secrets

For forty years the people of God wandered in the wilderness. They were living in “liberation limbo,” a dry and dusty place somewhere between Pharaoh and the Promised Land. Exodus 17 suggests that this was the first “protestant” congregation—the people protested bitterly to Moses that they were parched with thirst. God answered their prayer, giving them water from a rock.

The Revised Common Lectionary: Sources and Secrets

A Hymn on the Texts We Preach

(Today, we sing a song of holy insistence in the key of confession.) Verse One. Do we know we are texts read in the carefullest of ways? —lest we forget our constitution, the declarations that got us here, stay us here, in history’s substantial yet somber junctures.

The Revised Common Lectionary: Sources and Secrets

Widows, Sodomites, and Welfare Queens: The Radical Potential of Queer Lectionaries?

In the second chapter of Crip Theory: Cultural Signs of Queerness and Disability, Robert McRuer analyzes the case of Karen Thompson, whose live-in partner, Sharon Kowalski, was disabled in a car accident. Because this happened in the 1990s, these two women’s relationship could not be legally recognized. Kowalski’s medical care and consent defaulted to her parents, who denied Thompson the ability to visit Kowalski and insisted that Kowalski was too disabled to go home, effectively incarcerating their daughter to a medical facility.

The Revised Common Lectionary: Sources and Secrets

Translating the Faith

“Translations are the devil’s way of confusing Christians so we don’t all read the same Bible.” Quite a theological treatise from my Lyft driver as he drove me to the airport. Many people share his suspicions, neatly summarized in the quip: “If the King James Version was good enough for Jesus, it’s good enough for me.”

Contemplative Communion

Contemplative Communion

Blessed are you, Holy One, God, Creator of the universe. You bring forth bread from the earth, and create the fruit of the vine, to sustain our lives and gladden our hearts. They shall be for us today the Bread of Life and the Cup of Salvation, offered in grateful remembrance of Christ.

On Liturgy: The Written Word to Be Spoken, to Be Heard

On the Arts: Reflections on Art-Based Workshops for Pastors

In Protestant traditions, text and proclamation—spoken, sung, or silently read—are paramount to Christian formation. Broadening the phrase to include physical pronouncements involves the senses, thus why artistic processes help enlarge the incarnational dimensions of proclamation. This is one reason why I, a trained artist and theologian, decided to establish and facilitate a series of art-based, leadership-development workshops for pastors.